Showing posts with label ICTEC. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ICTEC. Show all posts

18 November 2018

Pairing AI and Nukes Will Lead to Our Autonomous Doomsday

by Lori Esposito Murray

As we commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, which transformed how wars are fought and won, the world again stands on the precipice of a dramatic revolution in warfare, this one driven by artificial intelligence. While both AI and the debate about the implications of autonomous decision capabilities in warfare are only in their early stages, the one area where AI holds perhaps the most peril is its potential role in how and when to use nuclear weapons.

Cyber Security Predictions 2019: More nations to develop offensive cyber capabilities, says FireEye

By Sanjay Singh

Cyber Security Predictions 2019: With technologies like artificial intelligence, machine learning and cloud computing enabling new innovation and business models, there has been significant growth in the digital transformation journey of both enterprises and public sector organisation across the globe. But this transformation is also bringing a new kind of challenge related to cyber security.

Various reports suggest that with advancement in technology, the attackers have also become sophisticated and advanced. In many cyber attack cases, they are not leaving any traceable spot. Along with this, nations are trying to improve their cyber espionagecapabilities. This has really compounded the impact that a cyber attack could have on a nation or large organisation.

Air Force to wrap up electronic warfare study by January

By: Valerie Insinna  

WASHINGTON — Big changes to the Air Force’s electronic warfare capabilities may be coming in 2019.

The service’s yearlong EW study is drawing to a close, with a final report expected in mid-January, Gen. Stephen Wilson, the Air Force’s vice chief of staff, told reporters Wednesday.

“We’re about two months away from having the results of that,” he said.

Recognizing that future wars will not be solely fought on ground, sea and air, the U.S. Air Force is kicking off a third-study on how it plans to use electronic warfare (EW).

Wilson announced the EW study in late 2017. Then, Brig. Gen. David Gaedecke, the Air Force’s director of cyberspace operations and warfighting integration, was tapped earlier this year to lead an “enterprise capability collaboration team” that would explore new ways to perform electronic warfare and how to integrate those capabilities across the service.

Delay, Deny and Deflect: How Facebook’s Leaders Fought Through Crisis

By Sheera Frenkel, Nicholas Confessore, Cecilia Kang, Matthew Rosenberg and Jack Nicas

Inside Facebook’s Menlo Park, Calif., headquarters, top executives gathered in the glass-walled conference room of its founder, Mark Zuckerberg. It was September 2017, more than a year after Facebook engineers discovered suspicious Russia-linked activity on its site, an early warning of the Kremlin campaign to disrupt the 2016 American election. Congressional and federal investigators were closing in on evidence that would implicate the company.

But it wasn’t the looming disaster at Facebook that angered Ms. Sandberg. It was the social network’s security chief, Alex Stamos, who had informed company board members the day before that Facebook had yet to contain the Russian infestation. Mr. Stamos’s briefing had prompted a humiliating boardroom interrogation of Ms. Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, and her billionaire boss. She appeared to regard the admission as a betrayal.

Big Bad Data: Achilles’ Heel Of Artificial Intelligence

by Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

WASHINGTON: Behind the bright buzzwords about artificial intelligence, the dreary reality is that machine learning algorithms only work if they’re trained on large sets of data — and your dataset may be too small, mislabeled, inaccurate, or outright falsified by malicious actors. As officials from the NSA, NGA, and Armywarned today, big data is just a big problem if that data is bad.

Big bad data is a particularly acute problem in the national security sector, where the chief threat is not mundane cyber-criminals but sophisticated and well-funded nation-states. If a savvy adversary knows what dataset your AI is training on — and because getting enough good data is so difficult, a lot of datasets are widely shared — they at least have a head start in figuring out how to deceive it. At worst, the enemy can feed you false data so your AI learns the version of reality they want it to know.

The Brilliant and the Absurd in Vienna

By George Friedman

A geopolitical journey into the city that was once the intellectual and cultural center of Europe.

I first came to Austria when I was six months old and left a little over a year later. Oddly, I can’t seem to recall it, but in college and the years that followed, I visited many times. Austria was the borderland of the Cold War and where many journeys started. It bordered Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Yugoslavia. It also bordered Germany and Italy, as well as neutral Switzerland – allowing access to France and beyond. And since it was neutral and weak, people from all over the world could get to Austria and, from Austria, to the rest of Europe.

Vienna was a place where chaos and intrigue were easily stirred. Soviet intelligence used it as the gateway to the West. Western intelligence used it as the gateway to the East. Others used it as a way to simply get somewhere else. The cafes at the outer rings were filled with people who knew someone who knew someone who might get something done, for a fee. Nearer the center of the city were more official-looking, well-dressed men, pretending to know far more than they actually did. There were also extremely attractive women looking for official-looking men to cause them to commit a massive error in judgment.

Cyberwarfare: the danger and potential answers


From the world wide web to cyberwarfare?

What is cyberwarfare? “A true act of cyberwar would be a wider targeting of critical infrastructure but also incorporate attacks on military infrastructure. For example, the Russian attacks during the Russo-Georgian war over South Ossetia. We have seen and will continue to see cyber-attacks on a nation state level towards other nations to test capabilities impacting infrastructure, industries and government operations. Some recent examples include infecting accounting software with ransomware, taking out power grid operations and impacting national healthcare organisations. The lines are blurred today as attribution is not always clear and detection often takes months if not years in some cases. Cyber is not always timely or immediately visible like a direct hit in traditional attacks like 911 or suicide bombings at cafes or train stations.”

THE US SITS OUT AN INTERNATIONAL CYBERSECURITY AGREEMENT

BERTRAND GUAY

DURING A SPEECH at the annual UNESCO Internet Governance Forum in Paris Monday, French President Emmanuel Macron announced the “Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace,” a new initiative designed to establish international norms for the internet, including good digital hygiene and the coordinated disclosure of technical vulnerabilities. The document outlines nine goals, like helping to ensure foreign actors don’t interfere with elections and working to prevent private companies from “hacking back,” or retaliating for a cybercrime. It’s endorsed by more than 50 nations, 90 nonprofits and universities, and 130 private corporations and groups. The United States is not one of them.

The Paris Call ultimately lacks teeth; it doesn’t require governments or corporations legally adhere to any specific principles. It’s mostly a symbol of the need for diplomacy and cooperation in cyberspace, where it’s hard to enforce any single country’s laws. More notable than the accord itself is who signed it. Major American technology corporations including Microsoft, Facebook, Google, IBM, and HP all endorsed the agreement.

Emmanuel Macron’s ‘arms control’ deal for cyber warfare


French President Emmanuel Macron issued an international call to limit hostile activity in cyberspace, laying out rules that would act as a form of “arms control” for the digital age.

In a speech at the Paris Peace Forum on Monday, a day after world leaders commemorated the 100-year anniversary of the end of World War I, Macron touted an agreement already signed by over 50 countries and 250 organizations pledging to counter threats such as state-sponsored hacking, cyberattacks on critical infrastructure and the spread of misinformation.

“The internet is at risk,” Macron said while presenting the initiative, known as the Paris Call for Trust & Security in Cyberspace. “Malicious actors are clashing online, using digital products as weapons.”

Forcepoint Predicts A Cyber Cold War In 2019


Cyber experts and research teams warn of risks to critical infrastructure and national intelligence, threats to biometric identification and over-reliance on AI in cybersecurity

Global cybersecurity leader Forcepoint today launched its 2019 Forcepoint Cybersecurity Predictions Report, with security specialists, behavioral intelligence researchers and data scientists providing guidance on the sophisticated threats facing organizations in the months to come.

The report examines seven areas where risks will increase in 2019, with Forcepoint experts taking a deep dive into technology trends and the motivation behind cyber-attacks, so that business and government leaders and their security teams can better prepare to face the new wave of threats.Enterprises and governments are facing a hyper-converged world where connected systems put not only critical data and intellectual property but also physical safety at risk. The report explores these areas and concludes that when people can collaborate in a trusted manner, leveraging data creatively and freely through technology, businesses can securely innovate to create value.

17 November 2018

ran prepares cryptocurrency as US cuts SWIFT services

By LUKE THOMPSON

The severance has been planned for a couple of days but actually took place this week, RT has reported. US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the move was “the right decision to protect the integrity of the international financial system.”

The Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT), touts itself as the global provider of secure financial messaging services. The organization has traditionally been seen as an independent entity. However, this latest move has shown its centralization and loyalty to the US, which evidently controls the global banking system.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had warned SWIFT that there would be “penalties applied” to firms that do not comply with the latest round of sanctions. Stuck between a rock and a hard place, SWIFT could now face EU penalties for siding with the US and violating its own Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) laws prohibiting companies siding with sanctions.

Pentagon Wants More Money for Lasers To Defend Against Missiles, Drone Swarms

BY PATRICK TUCKER

The U.S. military will request more money to develop lasers, microwave beams, and other directed-energy defenses to fight off missiles and drone swarms, the Pentagon’s top weapons engineer said Tuesday. “You’re going to see, in upcoming budgets for missile defense, a renewed emphasis on laser scaling [meaning scaling up the power of lasers] across several technologies,” Michael Griffin, defense undersecretary for research and engineering, said at an event hosted by the Center for Strategic International Studies.

Griffin, a former NASA administrator, has previously floated the idea of firing neutral particle beams from satellites to disable enemy missiles shortly after launch.

Global Cyber Resilience Think Tank Concludes Actionable Threat Intelligence is a Priority


Mimecast Limited (NASDAQ:MIME), a leading email and data security company, today announced it has released the latest report Threat Intelligence: Far-fetched Idea or Must-have Security Tactic? from the Cyber Resilience Think Tank, an independent group of more than a dozen security leaders dedicated to working together to address cyber resilience challenges facing organizations.

In this Mimecast-sponsored report, insights from global IT leaders have been sewn together to offer first-hand prescriptive advice and tactics for navigating the challenges of threat intelligence, including how to make actionable threat intelligence a priority in any sized organization. As one leader explains, "Good, actionable threat intelligence can help tell you who is behind an attack, the tools and tactics used, the who, the how and what they're after."

Opinion | Operation Infektion

By Adam B. Ellick and Adam Westbrook


Russia’s meddling in the United States’ elections is not a hoax. It’s the culmination of Moscow’s decades-long campaign to tear the West apart. “Operation InfeKtion” reveals the ways in which one of the Soviets’ central tactics — the promulgation of lies about America — continues today, from Pizzagate to George Soros conspiracies. Meet the KGB spies who conceived this virus and the American truth squads who tried — and are still trying — to fight it. Countries from Pakistan to Brazil are now debating reality, and in Vladimir Putin’s greatest triumph, Americans are using Russia’s playbook against one another without the faintest clue.

Meet the KGB Spies Who Invented Fake News

THE US SITS OUT AN INTERNATIONAL CYBERSECURITY AGREEMENT


DURING A SPEECH at the annual UNESCO Internet Governance Forum in Paris Monday, French President Emmanuel Macron announced the “Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace,” a new initiative designed to establish international norms for the internet, including good digital hygiene and the coordinated disclosure of technical vulnerabilities. The document outlines nine goals, like helping to ensure foreign actors don’t interfere with elections and working to prevent private companies from “hacking back,” or retaliating for a cybercrime. It’s endorsed by more than 50 nations, 90 nonprofits and universities, and 130 private corporations and groups. The United States is not one of them.

The Paris Call ultimately lacks teeth; it doesn’t require governments or corporations legally adhere to any specific principles. It’s mostly a symbol of the need for diplomacy and cooperation in cyberspace, where it’s hard to enforce any single country’s laws. More notable than the accord itself is who signed it. Major American technology corporations including Microsoft, Facebook, Google, IBM, and HP all endorsed the agreement.

GOOGLE INTERNET TRAFFIC WASN'T HIJACKED, BUT IT WAS OUT OF CONTROL

DAN KITWOOD

FOR TWO HOURS Monday, internet traffic that was supposed to route through Google's Cloud Platform instead found itself in quite unexpected places, including Russia and China. But while the haphazard routing invoked claims of traffic hijacking—a real threat, given that nation states could use the technique to spy on web users or censor services—the incident turned out to be a simple mistake with outsized impacts.

Google noted that almost all traffic to its services is encrypted, and wasn't exposed during the incident no matter what. As traffic pinballed across ISPs, though, some observers, including the monitoring firm ThousandEyes, saw signs of malicious BGP hijacking—a technique that manipulates the web's Border Gateway Protocol, which helps ISPs automatically collaborate to route traffic seamlessly across the web.

Pentagon task force not a ‘quick-fix’ to protect critical technology

By: Justin Lynch 

Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis created a task force Oct. 24 to protect critical technology and prevent data-exfiltration of closely guarded secrets by foreign governments.

“This is not a ‘quick-fix’ task force,” Joseph Buccino, a spokesperson for the Pentagon, told Fifth Domain in an email. “The loss of technology and data critical to our national security is a long-term problem.”

Air Force Maj. Gen. Thomas Murphy will lead the task force. He was previously served as the deputy director of command, control, communications and computers and cybersecurity for the Department’s Joint Staff. He has also served as vice commander of the 24th Air Force and Air Force cyber.

The Pentagon still has not implemented a 2015 law requiring cyberthreat sharing

By: Justin Lynch 

The Pentagon has not fully implemented a 2015 law aimed at improving how agencies share cyberthreat indicators and defensive measures, according to an inspector general’s report released Nov. 13.

The Cybersecurity and Information Sharing Act, or CISA, has not been fully implemented because the Pentagon’s chief information officer did not establish a policy to follow the new rule, the report said.

“As a result, the DoD limited its ability to gain a more complete understanding of cybersecurity threats,” the report read.

U.S. hasn't signed cyber principles — yet


The United States has not signed the Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace, a pact between 51 countries and hundreds of the important companies in tech, nonprofits and universities. At least, not yet.

The big picture: Signatories tell Axios that the U.S. hasn't shut the door on the agreement of general principles for internet security. The agreement, a first-of-its-kind document involving both the public and private sector, could be a significant step toward a global understanding of what countries are and aren't permitted to do online — but that's likely only if the U.S. lends its heft.

What they're saying: "It is a missed opportunity for the U.S., especially because the agreement is nonbinding," Peter Singer, a strategist and senior fellow at the New America Foundation, told Codebook via email.

U.S. faces worst national security crisis in decades, commission warns


U.S. national security is in greater peril “than at any time in decades,” according to a new report from a panel of top national security experts tasked by Congress with reviewing the state of American national defense.

Why it matters: The U.S. has entered into an era of "great power competition" with China, which poses an unprecedented challenge to U.S. dominance both economically and militarily, and with an increasingly assertive Russia. According to the report from the National Defense Strategy Commission, American military superiority has deteriorated to the point where the U.S. “might struggle to win, or perhaps lose, a war against China or Russia.” As U.S. superiority fades, the authors write, the likelihood of war rises.