Showing posts with label Important Papers. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Important Papers. Show all posts

8 January 2020

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Johns Hopkins APL Technical Digest, v. 35, no. 1, 2019

o Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Spectrum Collaboration Challenge at APL: Introduction

o Overview of the Colosseum: The World’s Largest Test Bed for Radio Experiments

o Software Project Management for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Spectrum Collaboration Challenge

o Development and Operations on the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency’s Spectrum Collaboration Challenge

o The Resource Manager for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Spectrum Collaboration Challenge Test Bed

o Standard Radio Nodes in the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Spectrum Collaboration Challenge

Royal United Services Institute (RUSI)


Nuclear Power in a Changing UK 

Tactical Nuclear Weapons and Deterrence Stability in South Asia 

Britain’s Weapons Establishment and Tacit Knowledge: Selling Skills 

Could Generation IV Nuclear Reactors Strengthen Russia’s Growing Sphere of Influence? 

Deterrence Goes Orbital 

New Futures for Nuclear Arms Control: Hypersonic Weapons 

Conventional and Nuclear Applications of Artificial Intelligence: A Brief Examination of India and Pakistan 

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Strategic Stability, Escalation and Nuclear Security 

A Troubling Forecast: Climate Change and the Future of Nuclear Deterrence 

UK Political Understanding of the Term ‘Nuclear Deterrence’: Addressing a Deficiency 

More than a Mission: Simulating a Support Solution to Achieve Submarine Availability, Cost and Safety 

Betwixt and Between Transformation? India and Nuclear South Asia 

The UK and the Ban Treaty 


7 January 2020

Army University Press


o Field Manual 4-0: Driving Sustainment Change

o A Logic All Its Own: Russian Operational Art in the Syrian Campaign

o The Small-Team Replacement System: Wartime Replacement Systems in Large-Scale Combat Operations

o Leadership during Large-Scale Combat Operations

o Developing Readiness to Trust Artificial Intelligence within Warfighting Teams

o Not an Intellectual Exercise: Lessons from U.S.-Israeli Institutional Army Cooperation, 1973–1982

o Have I Ever Been to War?

o Air Supremacy: Are the Chinese Ready?

5 January 2020

Cyber, Intelligence, and Security


o The Space Arms Race: Global Trends and State Interests

o Sectoral Ability to Manage Cyber Risks in the Supply Chain

o Technology and Intelligence: Changing Trends in the IDF’s Intelligence Process in the Post-Information Revolution Period

o Cyber Influence Campaigns in the Dark Web

o Social Change Through Computerized Accessibility of Legal Rules

o The Use of Biometric Technologies—Normative and Legal Aspects

4 January 2020

Henley Putnam University

· Journal of Strategic Security, 2019, v. 12, no. 4

o Huachicoleros: Criminal Cartels, Fuel Theft, and Violence in Mexico

o Profiling Lone-Actor Terrorists: A Cross-Sectional Study of Lone-actor Terrorists in Western Europe (2015–2016)

o Can Volunteer Forces Deter Great Power War? Evidence from the Baltics

o The Future of Strategic Information and Cyber-Enabled Information Operations

o Delegated Interstate War: Introducing an Addition to Armed Conflict Typologies

3 January 2020

Centre for Military, Security and Strategic Studies

Journal of Military and Strategic Studies, 2019, v. 20, no. 1

o Israel and the Permanent Siege: The People Have Spoken - Who Will Find an Answer to the Needs of the Voters?

o The Global Expansion of China’s Military – 2019

o Geostrategy and Canadian Defence: From C.P. Stacey to a Twenty-First Century Arctic Threat Assessment

o The Economic forces of victory versus those of defeat: An analysis of the Greek Economic and Military Mobilization of the 1909-1923 Period

o The Devil is in the Details: An Examination of Hybrid Cyber Operations and International Law

o Vergennes’ Grey Zone: Grappling with the Grey Zone and Hybrid War through French Strategy 1774–1783

o Women on the Home Front: Gender Roles and IODE Contributions to the War Effort in Winnipeg, Manitoba

o Can Information Displace Mass? Armour In The Future Operating Environment

o The PLAN’s Anti-Piracy Missions in the Gulf of Aden, Africa

o The Role Of Artificial Intelligence In Facilitating Military Innovation

o The State Of Strategic And Security Studies In Canada: Workshop Report

29 December 2019

Air University

Air and Space Power Journal, v. 33, no. 4, Winter 2019

o Unfinished Business: Refining the Air Component Structure

o Space Power and the Foundations of an Independent Space Force

o Evaluating the Train-Advise-Assist Mission Impact on Engineering and Facilities Management in the Afghan Air Force

o Leadership and Ethics across the Continuum of Learning: The Ethical Leadership Framework

o Consolidating and Automating Social Media Impacts to Risk

o On Critical Thinking: It Takes Habits of Mind and Patterns of Inquiry

o The US Air Force Suicide Prevention Program and Our Airmen Today

o A Case for Open Mission Systems in DOD Aircraft Avionics

23 November 2019

Military Review, November-December 2019, v. 99, no. 6


o The Geoeconomic Dimensions of Russian Private Military and Security Companies
o Order from Chaos: Inside U.S. Army Civil Affairs Activities
o Empathetic Leadership: Understanding the Human Domain
o Integration of Women and Gender Perspective into the Myanmar Armed Forces to Improve Civil-Military Relations in Myanmar
o Motivating and Educating Millennials
o Military Transformation: Effort and Institutional Commitment
o Trailblazers of Unmanned Ground Vehicles: Defense Threat Reduction Agency and Marine Corps Warfighting Lab
o A Last Moment Caught
o Mobilizing History to Promote Patriotism and a New Past
o Shadows of War: Violence along the Korean Demilitarized Zone
o Fighting Forward: Modernizing U.S. Army Reconnaissance and Security for Great Power Conflict
o Global Contingency Plans: A New Look at War Planning
o All Socialists Are Equal, but Some Are More Equal Than Others
o Bombs without Boots: The Limits of Airpower

5 July 2019

Gaining Competitive Advantage in the Gray Zone

PDF file 2.4 MB 

The United States is entering a period of intensifying strategic competition with several rivals, most notably Russia and China. U.S. officials expect this competition to be played out primarily below the threshold of armed conflict, in what is sometimes termed the gray zone between peace and war. In this report, the authors examine how the United States might respond to Russian and Chinese efforts to seek strategic advantage through coercive actions in the gray zone, including military, diplomatic, informational, and economic tactics. The United States is ill prepared and poorly organized to compete in this space, yet the authors' findings suggest that the United States can begin to treat the ongoing gray zone competition as an opportunity more than a risk. Moreover, leaders in Europe and Asia view Russian and Chinese gray zone aggression as a meaningful threat and are receptive to U.S. assistance in mitigating it. In this report, the authors use insights from their extensive field research in affected countries, as well as general research into the literature on the gray zone phenomenon, to sketch out the elements of a strategic response to the gray zone challenge and develop a menu of response options for U.S. officials to consider.

3 July 2019

Sharpening Our Efforts: The Role of International Development in Countering Violent Extremism


Thanks to the generous support and cooperation from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the CSIS Project on Prosperity and Development releases this new essay anthology, Sharpening Our Efforts: The Role of International Development in Countering Violent Extremism. As policymakers confront the ongoing challenge of radicalization and violent extremism, it is important that stakeholders and counterterrorism strategists recognize the critical role for development and other non-kinetic approaches to counter violent extremism (CVE). To that end, this new anthology takes a multidimensional role mapping out the role of soft power institutions in enabling lasting peace, prosperity, and global security.

This report is made possible through the generous support from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

2 July 2019

Gaining Competitive Advantage in the Gray Zone

PDF file 2.4 MB 

The United States is entering a period of intensifying strategic competition with several rivals, most notably Russia and China. U.S. officials expect this competition to be played out primarily below the threshold of armed conflict, in what is sometimes termed the gray zone between peace and war. In this report, the authors examine how the United States might respond to Russian and Chinese efforts to seek strategic advantage through coercive actions in the gray zone, including military, diplomatic, informational, and economic tactics. The United States is ill prepared and poorly organized to compete in this space, yet the authors' findings suggest that the United States can begin to treat the ongoing gray zone competition as an opportunity more than a risk. Moreover, leaders in Europe and Asia view Russian and Chinese gray zone aggression as a meaningful threat and are receptive to U.S. assistance in mitigating it. In this report, the authors use insights from their extensive field research in affected countries, as well as general research into the literature on the gray zone phenomenon, to sketch out the elements of a strategic response to the gray zone challenge and develop a menu of response options for U.S. officials to consider.

29 June 2019

Report on Time Allocation and Work Perceptions of Teachers


200 teachers from 39 government and municipal schools in Delhi, were surveyed between December 2017 and April 2018 to unpack their work and role related perceptions and to map the time spent by them on various school activities. Teachers were found to be juggling multiple activities in settings with low capacity and resources. The situation is exacerbated due to planning and management issues. This in turn is affecting the quality and time spent on academic tasks, as well as teacher morale. Download PDF

26 June 2019

Sustaining Multilateralism in a Multipolar World


While international multilateralism is under strain, it is vital for France and Germany to defend it, since it is the most appropriate system for preserving their interests – particularly in terms of welfare, security, prosperity and environmental protection. Against this backdrop, three political fields offer opportunities for joint initiatives: trade, conventional arms control and climate change.

25 June 2019

Making America Great Again versus Made in China


The trade conflict between the United States and China is a severe threat to the world economy. While the debate over the effectiveness of tariffs is at a steady boil in the United States, the EU is opposed to tariffs as a means for dealing with China. Although serious issues with China must be addressed – such as dumping and subsidization – tariffs will make the United States neither more competitive nor secure.


24 June 2019

China's Changing Role in the Middle East

BY JONATHAN FULTON

A quiet shift in geopolitics has been taking place, with East Asia and the Middle East drawing closer together. Energy trade explains part of this, as Japan, South Korea, and China are consistently among the largest export markets for Middle East oil and gas. In the case of China, the relationships have moved beyond economic interests to incorporate strategic concerns as well. The Atlantic Council's Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East report has released a new report by Dr. Jonathan Fulton on this subject: "China's Changing Role in the Middle East." The report analyzes China’s presence in the Middle East, examines the response of Middle Eastern states, and explores how US-China competition plays out in the region: are their interests compatible, creating opportunities for cooperation, or do they diverge to the point that competition is the most likely outcome?

23 June 2019

Radicalization: the origins and limits of a contested concept


‘Radicalization’ has a twisted history. At every turn, it gained a new meaning without shedding the existing one. In the beginning, ‘radicalization’ meant Muslims espousing an anti-Western, fundamentalist stance, with Iran as the epicentre of a global Muslim insurgency. In the wake of the 9/11 attacks, it started to be loosely used as a synonym of ‘anger’. A number of Muslims were said to become increasingly angry as a result of a wide variety of ‘root causes’. But almost simultaneously, it became intertwined with ‘recruitment’ by foreign extremists, who tried to persuade these angry individuals to join foreign war zones.

In 2004, another layer was added when ‘self- radicalization’ became the buzzword, since it appeared that one could also develop into a terrorist through kinship and friendship networks. That year, the EU officially embraced the concept. Myriad models and studies were financed to try to clarify the long, step- by-step process through which an individual radicalized into a terrorist.

But, in a new twist, by 2015–2016 it became obvious that radicalization didn’t require a long process after all.

THE DAWN OF ROBOT SURVEILLANCE


Imagine a surveillance camera in a typical convenience store in the 1980s. That camera was big and expensive, and connected by a wire running through the wall to a VCR sitting in a back room. There have been significant advances in camera technology in the ensuing decades — in resolution, digitization, storage, and wireless transmission — and cameras have become cheaper and far more prevalent. Still, for all those advances, the social implications of being recorded have not changed: when we walk into a store, we generally expect that the presence of cameras won’t affect us. We expect that our movements will be recorded, and we might feel self-conscious if we notice a camera, especially if we’re doing anything that we feel might attract attention. But unless something dramatic occurs, we generally understand that the videos in which we appear are unlikely to be scrutinized or monitored. All that is about to change. 

Today’s capture-and-store video systems are starting to be augmented with active monitoring technology known variously as “video analytics,” “intelligent video analytics,” or “video content analysis.” The goal of this technology is to allow computers not just to record but also to understand the objects and actions that a camera is capturing. This can be used to alert the authorities when something or someone deemed “suspicious” is detected, or to collect detailed information about video subjects for security or marketing purposes. Behind all the dumb video camera “eyes” that record us will increasingly lie ever-smarter “brains” that will be monitoring us. As we will see, technologists are working on teaching computers to do that monitoring in remarkable ways across a broad variety of dimensions. 

Ideas for Modernizing the Rules-based International Order


Chatham House experts examine how the international system can adapt to today’s challenges – from responding to reduced confidence in multilateralism to coordinating action on climate change.

In this 2019 edition of Chatham House Expert Perspectives – our annual survey of risks and opportunities in global affairs – our researchers identify areas where the current sets of rules, institutions and mechanisms for peaceful international cooperation are falling short.

In a series of 19 essays, we present ideas for reforming and modernizing global governance in critical domains, examining both whether the concept of a ‘rules-based international order’ makes sense in contemporary contexts and what needs to be done to make it fit for purpose.

The essays are available as a PDF, or each one can be read online below. Download PDF

DATA PROTECTION: Federal Agencies Need to Strengthen Online Identity Verification Processes


The federal government relies on commercial credit agencies to help verify the identities of people who apply for benefits online—such as asking personal questions from credit files. However, the 2017 Equifax data breach has raised questions about this practice.

There are alternative methods to verify identity, such as comparing a photo of an ID card captured on a cell phone to documentation on file, but federal agencies have had issues with implementing them. For instance, not all applicants have cell phones.

We recommended that the National Institute of Standards and Technology provide guidance on implementing these alternative methods.

Last Call for SATCOM Security


ICIT CERTIFIED: In this paper, the researchers at IOActive, an ICIT Fellow Circle Member, offer three real-world scenarios involving serious vulnerabilities that affect the aviation, maritime, and military industries. It has been reviewed by ICIT researchers and is certified as an educational document. ICIT encourages stakeholders to read this paper and distribute it widely to share its contents.

This research comprehensively details three real-world scenarios involving serious vulnerabilities that affect the aviation, maritime, and military industries. The vulnerabilities include backdoors, insecure protocols, and network misconfigurations. This white paper elaborates the approach and technical details of these vulnerabilities, which could allow remote attackers, originated from the Internet, to take control of:

• Airborne SATCOM equipment on in-flight commercial aircrafts
• Earth Stations on Vessels, including Antennas
• Earth Stations used by the US Military in conflict zones

Hundreds of commercial airplanes from airlines such as Southwest, Norwegian, and Icelandair were found to be affected by these issues. Today, it is still possible to find vessels that are exposed to the Internet, leaving them vulnerable to malicious attacks. Also, we are providing the evidences to demonstrate that Internet of Things (IoT) malware was found actively trying to exploit exposed aircraft, as well as vessels that were already infected.