Showing posts with label Intelligence. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Intelligence. Show all posts

9 October 2018

PERSPECTIVES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN INTELLIGENCE FOR U.S. LEADERS


Threats to the international order from near-peer competitors and from rogue regimes, terrorists, and the proliferation of cyber weapons and weapons of mass destruction all challenge whether the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) will be able to fulfill its mission. It is unclear whether the IC is prepared to provide decisionmakers and warfighters with the intelligence they need and expect.

This Perspective presents five distinct discussions of changes the IC can make to meet these challenges in the areas of strategic warning; tasking, collection, processing, exploitation, and dissemination (TCPED); security, counterintelligence, and insider threats; open-source information; and surging for crises.

Each of the five discussions in this Perspective provides analysis and recommendations that may be read, acted on, and implemented alone—but the authors believe that the IC has an opportunity to make a major leap forward by acting in a coordinated manner on all five of the topics together.

6 October 2018

The Role of the Intelligence Officer: Knowing the Enemy


"If you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be imperiled in a hundred battles; if you do not know your enemies but do know yourself, you will win one and lose one; if you do not know your enemies nor yourself, you will be imperiled in every single battle." -Sun Tzu (The Art of War)

The nature of warfare continues to evolve, to the point where we don't know much of anything regarding our next major conflict; where it will occur, when, or how it will be fought. Despite this unnerving period of ambiguity, the basics concepts of warfare endure. Chief among these concepts is Sun Tzu’s principle of knowing your enemy while also knowing yourself. Unfortunately, as our Army prepares for combat through execution of decisive action, we persistently struggle to know the enemy. This problem stems from struggles across the Army in understanding how to employ and integrate the intelligence warfighting function at the tactical level.

4 October 2018

Blockchain and AI: A winning combo


Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Blockchain is the current craze right now. Why is AI important? Which AI Blockchain projects are there — and which of these will you need to focus on?

In this article expect a concise list of the most noteworthy AI Blockchain projects currently out there. The goal of this article is not to advertise what makes these projects great, instead its to compile a short list of which cryptocurrency projects employ AI technology.

Why Blockchain and AI technology?

In the past we have seen a hype cycle ensue around several concepts in the cryptosphere. For example, following the huge success of Dash we have seen a tremendous demand for Masternode-based cryptocurrencies as the promise of passive income was too big to ignore. Another popular feature was anonymity as we saw coins like Monero (XMR) and Verge (XVG) rise to tremendous heights as well. For the next hype cycle it is expected that AI will take charge as investors will turn their eye towards this winning combo instead.

3 October 2018

Will AI Help Create More Jobs? – Analysis

By Sandip Sen

In 2009, Martin Ford, the author of The New York Times best seller, ‘The Lights in the Tunnel: Automation, Accelerating Technology and the Economy of the Future’ predicted the loss of millions of jobs held by assembly line workers, cab drivers and retail store employees to automation driven by AI. In 2015 he wrote the award winning book ‘Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future’. At a conference in 2016, he said, “I wrote that self-driving cars might happen one day, and within six months of that book being published, we already had such a vehicle on the road,” he said. “It’s possible that taxi drivers and truck drivers will soon be out of work.’’

29 September 2018

UK spies go on the offensive with yet another costly intelligence agency


With all the already existing British intelligence agencies, it is puzzling why the UK needs yet another costly cyber force to counter Russia and terrorism amid national financial uncertainty.

The UK Ministry of Defence announced on 21 September the establishment of yet another British spy agency, an amalgam of military and security service professionals designed to wage cyber war against terrorists, Russia and organised crime. The new agency will have upwards of 2000 staff (the size MI5 was when I worked there in the 1990s, so not inconsiderable). I have been asked for a number of interviews about this and here are my thoughts in long form.

Perspectives and Opportunities in Intelligence for U.S. Leaders


Threats to the international order from near-peer competitors and from rogue regimes, terrorists, and the proliferation of cyber weapons and weapons of mass destruction all challenge whether the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) will be able to fulfill its mission. It is unclear whether the IC is prepared to provide decisionmakers and warfighters with the intelligence they need and expect.

This Perspective presents five distinct discussions of changes the IC can make to meet these challenges in the areas of strategic warning; tasking, collection, processing, exploitation, and dissemination (TCPED); security, counterintelligence, and insider threats; open-source information; and surging for crises.

Each of the five discussions in this Perspective provides analysis and recommendations that may be read, acted on, and implemented alone—but the authors believe that the IC has an opportunity to make a major leap forward by acting in a coordinated manner on all five of the topics together.

28 September 2018

Google DeepMind founder Demis Hassabis: Three truths about AI

By Nick Heath


The 2016 victory by a Google-built AI at the notoriously complex game of Go was a bold demonstration of the power of modern machine learning.

That triumphant AlphaGo system, created by AI research group Google DeepMind, confounded expectations that computers were years away from beating a human champion.

But as significant as that achievement was, DeepMind's co-founder Demis Hassabis expects it will be dwarfed by how AI will transform society in the years to come.

Hassabis spelt out his vision for the future of AI at the Economist Innovation Summit in London.

AI will save us from ourselves

27 September 2018

The Race for AI — China: 1, US: 0


“The Skynet Funding Bill is passed. The system goes on-line August 4th, 1997. Human decisions are removed from strategic defense. Skynet begins to learn at a geometric rate. It becomes self-aware at 2:14 a.m. Eastern time, August 29th. In a panic, they try to pull the plug.” Terminator 2: Judgement Day, 1991

The name “Skynet,” when used in the context of technology, might conjure images of James Bond or the neural net-based superintelligence from the sci-fi “Terminator” movie franchise. In China today, the latter is close to the truth, and it is no less sinister.

Far from science fiction, Skynet is an active Chinese government initiative that’s using artificial intelligence (AI) integrated with recognition systems to surveil its citizens. CB Insights describes the program that began in 2005 and how advances in technology such as machine learning and facial recognition have improved if not perfected Chinese government efforts to monitor and control its citizens.

9 September 2018

Notes from the frontier: Modeling the impact of AI on the world economy

By Jacques Bughin, Jeongmin Seong, James Manyika, Michael Chui, and Raoul Joshi

Artificial intelligence has large potential to contribute to global economic activity. But widening gaps among countries, companies, and workers will need to be managed to maximize the benefits. The role of artificial intelligence (AI) tools and techniques in business and the global economy is a hot topic. This is not surprising given that AI might usher in radical—arguably unprecedented—changes in the way people live and work. The AI revolution is not in its infancy, but most of its economic impact is yet to come.

21 August 2018

The New Physics of Financial Services – How artificial intelligence is transforming the financial ecosystem


Artificial intelligence is fundamentally changing the physics of financial services. It is weakening the bonds that have held together the component parts of incumbent financial institutions, opening the door to entirely new operating models and ushering in a new set of competitive dynamics that will reward institutions focused on the scale and sophistication of data much more than the scale or complexity of capital. A clear vision of the future financial landscape will be critical to good strategic and governance decisions as financial institutions around the world face growing competitive pressure to make major strategic investments in AI and policy makers seek to navigate the challenging regulatory and social uncertainties emerging globally.

16 August 2018

Covert Action, Military Operations and the DoD–CIA Debate

By J. Robert Kane

Covert action is making its name again. Back on the strategic foreign policy stage, covert action is a way to achieve diplomacy without direct military confrontation. Kinetic operations by way of targeted killing have become a hot (and disputed) topic. Even though Presidents Ford in 1976, Carter in 1978 and Regan in 1981 signed Executive Orders to ban political assassinations, the U.S. has engaged in targeted killings through drone strikes to kill enemy combatants on the battlefield. Signature strikes that target behavior patterns and personal networks often result in increased collateral damage, namely to civilians. Some of these actions are overt while others are covert, or at least clandestine in some nature. So, who does these things? Is it the military, CIA or even both?

14 August 2018

Artificial intelligence: Why a digital base is critical

By Jacques Bughin and Nicolas van

Early AI adopters are starting to shift industry profit pools. Companies need strong digital capabilities to compete. The diffusion of a new technology, whether ATMs in banking or radio-frequency identification tags in retailing, typically traces an S-curve. Early on, a few power users bet heavily on the innovation. Then, over time, as more companies rush to embrace the technology and capture the potential gains, the market opportunities for nonadopters dwindle. The cycle draws to a close with slow movers suffering damage.1
Stay current on your favorite topics

13 August 2018

Covert Action, Military Operations and the DoD–CIA Debate

By J. Robert Kane

Covert action is making its name again. Back on the strategic foreign policy stage, covert action is a way to achieve diplomacy without direct military confrontation. Kinetic operations by way of targeted killing have become a hot (and disputed) topic. Even though Presidents Ford in 1976, Carter in 1978 and Regan in 1981 signed Executive Orders to ban political assassinations, the U.S. has engaged in targeted killings through drone strikes to kill enemy combatants on the battlefield. Signature strikes that target behavior patterns and personal networks often result in increased collateral damage, namely to civilians. Some of these actions are overt while others are covert, or at least clandestine in some nature.

So, who does these things? Is it the military, CIA or even both?

8 August 2018

The Challenge of Bias in AI

By Matthew Bey

One of the most prominent topics at South by Southwest (SXSW) Interactive this year was Artificial Intelligence (AI), which has seen an explosion of interest over the last five years. A good AI application requires sifting through copious amounts of data in order for the AI platform to train itself and learn to recognize patterns. The challenge here, and one that several panels at SXSW focused on, was bias in data sets. When data sets are developed by humans, AI will mirror the biases of its creators. In 2015, for example, Google Photos auto-tagged several black people as gorillas because it lacked a database large enough for proper tagging. Other examples illuminate gender biases in machine learning.
Legal Implications of Discriminatory Algorithms

How Artificial Intelligence Can Help Employers Overcome the Demographic Crunch

Mark Hurd

Of all the challenges I face as a CEO, none is more critical than attracting and retaining talented people. The biggest obstacle isn’t organizational or economic—it’s demographic: Declining birth rates are starting to deplete the global labor pool. This problem is particularly acute in Japan, China, South Korea, and most of Western Europe, which have “sub-replacement” birth rates—that is, the number of children born is below the level needed to sustain population and ultimately employment levels. It’s also becoming a major concern in the United States, especially as the country’s declining high-school graduation rate and soaring college costs narrow the supply of highly skilled, highly technical people.

6 August 2018

AI and the Return of Great Power Competition

By Reva Goujon

Aging demographics and an emerging great power competition pitting China against the United States form the backdrop to a high-stakes race in artificial intelligence development. The United States, for now, has a lead overall in AI development, but China is moving aggressively to try and overtake its American rivals by 2030. While deep integration across tech supply chains and markets has occurred in the past couple of decades, rising economic nationalism and a growing battle over international standards will balkanize the global tech sector. AI advancements will boost productivity and economic growth, but creative destruction in the workforce will drive political angst in much of the world, putting China's digital authoritarianism model as well as liberal democracies to the test.

4 August 2018

The spy game is changing. It’s increasingly taking place in the daylight rather than in the shadows

Alex Finley

Mariia Butina wasn’t hiding. The red-headed, gun-toting young woman whom the FBI has accused of being a Russian spy posed with high-level Republican politicians, including Rick Santorum and Scott Walker, and other influential conservative players, like NRA chief Wayne LaPierre. She snapped photos at the National Prayer Breakfast, circulated at gun shows and conservative conferences, claiming she wanted to promote gun rights in Russia. She posed for Russian GQ, hoisting pistols while wearing stilettos, a black leather jacket and not much else. With her flaming red hair, which sometimes switched to blonde, she commanded—and got—attention.

22 July 2018

Here’s how much a new artificial intelligence center could cost

By: Mark Pomerleau  
Source Link

The Department of Defense plans to spend $1.7 billion over the next five years to stand up a new Joint Artificial Intelligence Center, according to new budgeting figures. The reprograming documents sent to Congress, obtained by C4ISRNET sister publication Defense News, outline the Pentagon plans to spend $5 million to get the center stood up with an estimated $70 million for the new project to be spent in fiscal year 2018. These funds will go toward the center’s establishment to “rapidly field Artificial Intelligence (AI) at scale to the Services and Combatant Commands (CCMDs) to effectively deploy AI-enabled capabilities in support of DoD’s warfighting missions and business functions,” the documents state.

13 July 2018

Senate Select Committee on Intelligence

The Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (SSCI) is conducting a bipartisan investigation into a wide range of Russian activities relating to the 2016 U.S. presidential election. While elements of the investigation are ongoing, the Committee is releasing initial, unclassified findings on a rolling basis as distinct pieces of the investigation conclude. The Committee has concluded an in-depth review of the Intelligence Community Assessment (ICA) produced by CIA, NSA, and FBI in January of 2017 on Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election (Assessing Russian Activities and Intentions in Recent U.S. Elections; declassified version released January 6, 2017) and have initial findings to share with the American people.

30 June 2018

The Wiretap Rooms: NSA’s Hidden Spy Hubs in 8 U.S. Cities

Ryan Gallagher and Henrik Moltke

THE SECRETS ARE hidden behind fortified walls in cities across the United States, inside towering, windowless skyscrapers and fortress-like concrete structures that were built to withstand earthquakes and even nuclear attack. Thousands of people pass by the buildings each day and rarely give them a second glance, because their function is not publicly known. They are an integral part of one of the world’s largest telecommunications networks – and they are also linked to a controversial National Security Agency surveillance program.
Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, New York City, San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, D.C. In each of these cities, The Intercept has identified an AT&T facility containing networking equipment that transports large quantities of internet traffic across the United States and the world. A body of evidence – including classified NSA documents, public records, and interviews with several former AT&T employees – indicates that the buildings are central to an NSA spying initiative that has for years monitored billions of emails, phone calls, and online chats passing across U.S. territory.